Gut Microbiota Hypolipidemic Modulating Role in Diabetic Rats Fed with Fermented Parkia biglobosa (Fabaceae) Seeds

  • Olayinka Anthony Awoyinka Department of Medical Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University Ado Ekiti Nigeri
  • Tola Racheal Omodara Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria
  • Funmilola Comfort Oladele Department of Medical Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University Ado Ekiti Nigeri
  • Margret Olutayo Alese Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University, Nigeria
  • Elijah Olalekan Odesanmi Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria
  • David Daisi Ajayi Department of Chemical Pathology, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria
  • Gbenga Sunday Adeleye Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria
  • Precious Bisola Sedowo Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria
Keywords: Gut, Microbiota, Probiotics, Hypolipidemic, Bacillus subtilis, Diabetes.

Abstract

Background: Modulation and balancing of host gut microbiota by probiotics has been documented by several literature. Prebiotic diets such as locust beans have been known to encourage the occurrence of these beneficial microorganisms in the host gut.

Objectives: To study the modulating role of gut microbiota in the hypolipidemic effect of fermented locust beans on diabetic Albino Wister rats as animal models.

Methodology: Albino rats (Wistar strain), averagely weighing 125g were successfully induced with alloxan. Thereafter this induction, anti-diabetic treatment was carried out on various groups of rats by feeding them ad-libitum with a diet of milled fermented and unfermented Parkia biglobosa seeds, respectively.

Results: After three weeks of treatment, it was observed that fermented locust beans caused a significant reduction (p ≤ 0.05) in glucose, total triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL, while the HDL levels were significantly elevated (p ≤ 0.05). Results of faecal analysis showed that the fermented locust beans modulated the gut microbiota through the occurrence of probiotic bacteria, Bacillus subtilis in the gut and faeces of the rats.

Conclusion: This study support that fermented locust beans is a prebiotic diet that encourages the growth of Bacillus subtilis in the gut of animals and is associated with hypolipidemic activities which alleviate diabetes as portrayed in these rat models.

Published
2020-12-30